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Northwest Native Art
A green and white button blanket featuring the Burke logo and an eagle breaking free of chains

Members of the Native American Cultural Group at the Washington State Reformatory Unit in Monroe recently created a very special button blanket for the Museum.

Green/blue Tsimshian frontlet on black background

In her research, curator Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse considers not only the visual aspects of historical Native art, but also the intangible properties to which they are connected.

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

The Burke Museum is pleased to welcome Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse as the new Curator of Northwest Native Art.

Kininnook's pole

Totem poles are thought of as symbols of Seattle by many residents and visitors, but, in fact, the indigenous people of Washington state did not traditionally carve totems. 

Siagut basket

The tools and technologies to make basketry, woven robes, canoes and other carvings.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Noted 19th century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw with the chest.

“As I was carving this chest front I felt like I was reconnecting with my ancestor.” – Christian White, Bill Holm Center grant recipient.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Puppet

Video from the Burke Museum's ArtTalk Symposium: Conversations on Northwest Native Art on March 27-28, 2015.

The updated 50th anniversary edition of Bill Holm’s definitive book on northern Northwest Coast art.

Outside Red Mill Totem Fish and Chips.

Despite its popularity, the identity of the carvers who made the poles has been misrepresented for years. 

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