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Bill Holm Center
Screenshot from a black and white film showing Mary Hunt dancing in the 1930 Boas-Kwagiulth Film

A look inside the process of creating the G̱a̱lg̱a̱poła (Working Together) digital book.

Black and white photo of a woman dancing the "feather dance" in Franz Boas 1930 film

A collaborative project to reunite existing archival media from far-flung institutions into a new digital whole, shaped by and integrated with active cultural knowledge by Kwag’uł contributors.

Tyson Simmons (Muckleshoot), Dusty Humphries (Jamestown S'Klallam/Makah), Brian Perry (Port Gamble S'Klallam) study objects in the Burke Museum collections during their 2016-17 Visiting Researcher Grant visit.

Visiting researcher Tyson Simmons teamed up with the Bill Holm Center to host a tool-making workshop.

A young man holds up a basket as a small child peers at the underside

The Bill Holm Center recently brought museum objects and shared object-handling knowledge at a two-day basketry workshop.

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Curator of Northwest Native Art

The Burke Museum is pleased to welcome Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse as the new Curator of Northwest Native Art.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Noted 19th century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw with the chest.

“As I was carving this chest front I felt like I was reconnecting with my ancestor.” – Christian White, Bill Holm Center grant recipient.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Puppet

Video from the Burke Museum's ArtTalk Symposium: Conversations on Northwest Native Art on March 27-28, 2015.

The updated 50th anniversary edition of Bill Holm’s definitive book on northern Northwest Coast art.

Bruce Alfred takes a closer look at the mask

We look back at what we’ve learned about the Native mask that inspired the original Seattle Seahawks logo in the past year.

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