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Archaeology

Archaeologists find the earliest use of nutmeg as a food ingredient and evidence of the transition to early farming practices in Indonesia.

Archaeological net weights

The Archaeology collections database includes artifacts from around with world with an emphasis on the Pacific Northwest. 

Researcher Ashley Pickard visits the Burke Museum to study shoe samples from the Japanese Gulch archaeological site.

Archaeologist Chris Yamamoto views Japanese Gulch artifacts with the help of Burke archaeologist Jack Johnson.

Archaeologist Chris Yamamoto visits the Burke to view artifacts found in the Japanese Gulch.

Reviving a Jukung through Burke Museum collections.

Burke researchers learn more about the Burke’s Balinese “jukung” outrigger canoe.

Burke archaeologists are working to preserve ancestral artifacts owned by the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe in the North Cascades. 

Columbia River at Kennewick

Information about the remains known as Kennewick Man/The Ancient One, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons found in North America. 

Beginning 4,000 years ago, people shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change occur?

Uncover thousands of years of history in Washington state at the Burke Museum's Archaeology Day.

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Jadeite Adze in Wood

This stone woodcarving adze—broken and embedded in a piece of cedar—is unlike most items in our archaeological collections. 

The traditional jukung in the Burke's offsite storage.

The Burke Museum has a traditional jukung in its Culture collections, but until recently its origins were a mystery.

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