Burke Blog

Two men on a lift move the letter E onto the new Burke Museum sign

The first of two new signs was installed at the New Burke earlier today!

A Burke Museum team recently returned from a research expedition to Antarctica—one of the most difficult places to do fieldwork in the world.

An articulated smilodon cast showing off their giant teeth

Be sure to say hello to the new saber-toothed cat and giant ground sloth in the Life and Times of Washington State exhibit on your next visit!

Julie Stein (left), Richard Olmstead (middle) and David Giblin hold the madrone specimen—the first object to be moved into the New Burke.

A specimen from a tree that once stood on the site of the new Burke Museum is the first object to be moved into the new building.

An illustration of Wimahl chinookensis.

Meet Wimahl chinookensis, a new species of fossil dolphin that lived about 18 million years ago in the waters of the Pacific Northwest.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ashley Pickard visits the Burke Museum to study shoe samples from the Japanese Gulch archaeological site.

Drawing of the welcome figure that will welcome visitors to the New Burke

The Burke Museum has commissioned a Coast Salish art piece for the lobby of the New Burke.

Less than two years later after the New Burke’s official groundbreaking, construction on the New Burke building is complete! 

Michelle Stocker, Sterling Nesbitt and Ken Angielczyk conduct fieldwork in Tanzania in 2015.

UW paleontologists and geologists, including Burke curator Christian Sidor, have uncovered new fossils in Zambia and Tanzania.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

Some of the baby plants being installed at the New Burke.

Thousands of native Northwest plants are going in on the north, west and south sides of the New Burke.

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