Burke Blog

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Animals being prepped in a visible lab at Testing, Testing 1-2-3.

Testing, Testing 1-2-3 included specimen prep in public view—here’s how people responded. 

Pile of the Elaphomyces truffles found in the ski boot.

The Herbarium helps to solve a mysterious discovery—in ski boots of all places! 

The T. rex skull in progress in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 workroom

The T. rex skull jacket is open, with the skull and the teeth almost fully revealed. 

People + Cultures

The Sugpiat community’s traditional Angyaaq boat is reconstructed and leaves shore for the first time in over a century.

Burke Museum visitors examine the blanket found to contain woolly dog fur.

A small tear in a blanket revealed a rare piece of history hiding in plain sight.

Artist Aaron Parker painting

Aaron Parker's and Chris Cunningham's premiered their live art performance, ƛ’ix̌aq: Animal Skin, at the Burke Museum

Environments

A new species of goby was discovered while being chased by an invasive lionfish outside of Curacao.

flowering purple butterfly bush

Graduate student John Chau discovers the origin of the Butterfly-bush, a familiar flowering plant in the Seattle area.

Learn about the Burke's research on the coastal-tailed frog, one of the specimens on display in our Wild Nearby exhibit.

Northwest Native Art

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Science

The T. rex skull in progress in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 workroom

The T. rex skull jacket is open, with the skull and the teeth almost fully revealed. 

We're reconstructing a full-scale Columbian mammoth using a combination of real and 3D-printed fossils from the collection.

Documenting the biodiversity of an important group of animals—one shell at a time. 

Burke Research

Animals being prepped in a visible lab at Testing, Testing 1-2-3.

Testing, Testing 1-2-3 included specimen prep in public view—here’s how people responded. 

Kristin Campbell holding a sea otter skull in the Burke mammal collection

Researcher Kristin Campbell looks into whether skull anatomy and bite force explain dietary differences in sea otters.

Visiting researcher Carlos Peredo returns to study early baleen whale fossils. 

Washington State

Pile of the Elaphomyces truffles found in the ski boot.

The Herbarium helps to solve a mysterious discovery—in ski boots of all places! 

At the Burke, we have a lot of big dreams—from discovering a T. rex to inspiring the next generation of paleontologists, weavers, conservationists and scientists.

The Burke Museum is working with researchers from Coastal Raptors to aid in conservation efforts for Washington's coastal raptors. 

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