Burke Blog

Most Recent

Two men on a lift move the letter E onto the new Burke Museum sign

The first of two new signs was installed at the New Burke earlier today!

A Burke Museum team recently returned from a research expedition to Antarctica—one of the most difficult places to do fieldwork in the world.

An articulated smilodon cast showing off their giant teeth

Be sure to say hello to the new saber-toothed cat and giant ground sloth in the Life and Times of Washington State exhibit on your next visit!

Subscribe to the monthly Burke Stories newsletter

Sign Up

People + Cultures

Researcher Ashley Pickard visits the Burke Museum to study shoe samples from the Japanese Gulch archaeological site.

Archaeologist Chris Yamamoto views Japanese Gulch artifacts with the help of Burke archaeologist Jack Johnson.

Archaeologist Chris Yamamoto visits the Burke to view artifacts found in the Japanese Gulch.

Tyson Simmons (Muckleshoot), Dusty Humphries (Jamestown S'Klallam/Makah), Brian Perry (Port Gamble S'Klallam) study objects in the Burke Museum collections during their 2016-17 Visiting Researcher Grant visit.

Visiting researcher Tyson Simmons teamed up with the Bill Holm Center to host a tool-making workshop.

Environments

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it.

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it. 

A new species of goby was discovered while being chased by an invasive lionfish outside of Curacao.

Northwest Native Art

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Science

Michelle Stocker, Sterling Nesbitt and Ken Angielczyk conduct fieldwork in Tanzania in 2015.

UW paleontologists and geologists, including Burke curator Christian Sidor, have uncovered new fossils in Zambia and Tanzania.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

The T. rex skull in progress in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 workroom

The T. rex skull jacket is open, with the skull and the teeth almost fully revealed. 

Burke Research

A Burke Museum team recently returned from a research expedition to Antarctica—one of the most difficult places to do fieldwork in the world.

The “Pocket Bats” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand.

The “Pocket Bats!” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand. 

Visiting researcher Sara ElShafie is looking at prehistoric reptiles fossils.

Visiting researcher Sara ElShafie looks at the effects of climate change on prehistoric reptiles.

Washington State

An illustration of Wimahl chinookensis.

Meet Wimahl chinookensis, a new species of fossil dolphin that lived about 18 million years ago in the waters of the Pacific Northwest.

Pile of the Elaphomyces truffles found in the ski boot.

The Herbarium helps to solve a mysterious discovery—in ski boots of all places! 

At the Burke, we have a lot of big dreams—from discovering a T. rex to inspiring the next generation of paleontologists, weavers, conservationists and scientists.

Back to Top